Tag Archives: Rashida Jones

The Parks and Rec Hall of Fame

26 Feb

As anybody with a two eyes and a heart knows, Parks and Recreation came to an end last week after seven seasons. I am both okay and not okay with this. I get it: seven years is a long time to tell a story; better to go out more or less ahead than fade into infinite joyless seasons; nearly everybody involved with this show is massively more famous than they were seven years ago, and probably wants to do other things; the entire series exists for my re-watching pleasure on Netflix. On the other hand, what other fictional people will assure us that goodness, loyalty, and beneficent enthusiasm exist in the world?

Truthfully, the Parks and Rec finale was not my favorite—hour-long sitcom episodes almost never are, especially when they have to Get Things Done—but it was very them: a series of reassuring flash-forwards, showing us the appropriate and fulfilling futures of the former employees of the Pawnee Parks Department. A lot of people loved it, and I’m sincerely glad they did.

But there were a lot of things I did love about Parks and Rec, and so here we are: The P.S. BTW Parks and Recreation Hall of Fame, a collection of favorite episodes, scenes, moments, and characters from seven years of greatness:

1. “Practice Date”

Season two was so long ago, and yet so much happens in this episode! Among other things: the introduction of Duke Silver, Louis CK in his recurring role as Leslie’s awkward cop boyfriend, the revelation of Tom’s green-card marriage, and a spectacular embodiment of dating angst in the person of Leslie Knope. This is also one of Ann’s finer moments of best-friend-hood/Leslie-wrangling. And hey, remember Mark Brendana-quits? That guy’s here, too. It’s a really good episode.

2. Ann + Leslie + April + Donna

Here’s a wish for the world: that every woman would have friends like the women of the Pawnee Parks Department. This is a show that created a fictional holiday to celebrate women’s friendships; even better, Ann and Leslie and April* and Donna act like real friends pretty much all the time, in ways that are disappointingly rare on TV. That includes showing up for one another, encouraging each other, telling each other painful truths, and refraining from backstabbing, in addition to the standard duties of brunch, relationship counseling, and the previously mentioned Leslie-wrangling.

(*April, of course, prefers not to act like real friends with anybody, but we all know her secret.)

3. “Andy and April’s Fancy Party” (aka April and Andy get married and I cryyyy)

I’m sorry, The Mindy Project, but “April Come She Will” has now been retired for sitcom purposes, and I feel like you should know that already.

4. “End of the World” (aka April and Andy go to the Grand Canyon and I cryyyy)

“End of the World” is a strange, sad, and wonderful episode for lots of reasons, but April and Andy’s spontaneous road trip is, in my opinion, one of the most beautiful moments of the series. There’s that Gabe Dixon Band song, and the Grand Canyon at golden hour, and a flash of unbridled earnestness…and then that perfect Chris Pratt line delivery at the end. It’s perfection.

5. Treat Yo Self

treat yo self

Truly, probably Parks and Rec’s greatest contribution to society at large. “Fine. Leather. Goods.”

6. Garry-Jerry-Larry-Terry Gergich

I once read an interview where the creators of Parks talked about the writers’ vision for Jerry, which I found really reassuring: the joke of Jerry, and the writers’ justification for him, is that Jerry is the office scapegoat who quietly lives the life every other character ultimately wants—and because of that, he doesn’t really need their validation. (Which: it’s a good thing.) Jerry lives in a beautiful home with his adoring wife, played by Christie Brinkley; he has four devoted daughters, cherishes every moment of work at the Parks Department, and spends his free time making beautiful paintings. Everybody is terrible to him—but he just might be the happiest and most well-adjusted person in Pawnee.

7. “Ben & Leslie” (aka Ben and Leslie get married and I cryyyy)

The fifth-season episode “Ben and Leslie” is like the series in miniature: A harebrained idea of Leslie’s causes the Parks Department crew to band together and make beautiful things happen, against all odds. Love triumphs. Ron says practically nothing, and saves the day. Leslie looks amazing in a dress made of newspaper. You know, the usual.

8. “5,000 Candles in the Wind,” A pop song about a Li’l Sebastian, a deceased miniature horse

FYI, you can get tabs and chords for this online.

9. Ben Wyatt & The Cones of Dunshire

Ben Wyatt is a passionate guy: passionate about Leslie, obviously, but also passionate about Batman, about Game of Thrones, about Letters to Cleo, about claymation (“Requiem for a Tuesday”), and about “the ninth highest-selling multi-player figurine-based strategy fantasy sequel game in history.” Adam Scott’s performance is always terrific, but these occasional geek-out monologues may be his best work.

10. Andy Dwyer on Rollerblades/Andy Dwyer jumping over things

Or jumping over things ON Rollerblades. “…Nailed it.”

This isn’t even a remotely comprehensive menu of everything that’s wonderful about this show; that would be a very, very long list. But it highlights a few of the qualities, people, and moments that have made Parks and Rec such a joy. Thanks, Pawnee.

You’ll thank me later

27 Oct

I am what you’d call a TV imperialist. Like any good empire-builder, it’s my mission to spread the glory of my riches to those who have no desire to receive them (or, you see, to those who don’t know what they’re missing! We will be greeted as liberators!)—I’m forever recommending shows to people, trying to coax them onto my favorite sections of Hulu and threatening to buy them whole seasons of my favorite shows, hoping they’ll want to talk about it. I pretend it’s for their benefit, but mostly it’s because I like creating new fans. I like watching people enjoy something they wouldn’t have known about otherwise. I like sharing stories.

Today, in the spirit of spreading democracy the joy of good TV, I present two of my favorite television shows—shows that you would love, whoever you are, but probably are not already watching. Don’t make me send you my DVDs (Hey, man, shipping is expensive).

Bones

Thursdays, 8 p.m., FOX; perpetual reruns on TNT

Bones

Premise: A socially awkward forensic anthropologist and her hottie FBI partner solve murders using the victims’ skeletons. Grossness, hilarity, and crazy sexual tension ensue.

Warning: Statistically, if you begin to watch this show, you will not stop. You will tell yourself that it is nonsensical, or inconsistent, or that you don’t really care about these characters, or that you’re going to do something else after just one more, but it will not matter. You will have discovered that murder and forensic anthropology are, in fact, made of puppies and rainbows and light, and you will be sucked in for good. And it will be a happy, happy day.

The thing is, you will not be wrong about those first things—Bones has been, on various occasions, nonsensical and inconsistent and a variety of other unpleasant things. Sometimes it still is, but it doesn’t matter: in its fifth season, this show may actually be the happiest show on television, and it’s still getting better. It’s funnier and gutsier and weirder and sweeter and maybe a bit smarter than it’s ever been, and how many shows can say that?

The secret of Bones is all in the cast—the story revolves around Booth (David Boreanaz) and Brennan (the grossly underrated Emily Deschanel), and they are delightful together, but the concentric circles of well-cast supporting characters, from the lab crew to Brennan’s family of (mostly) well-meaning convicts, are what make every episode feel like all of your favorite people are coming together for Thanksgiving dinner. This is the power of a great ensemble: you will love these people, and they will make bad TV ideas seem like good TV ideas just by showing up.  Crazy, apparently ill-advised plot points will arise (Remember the time Booth and Brennan went undercover with the circus as a Russian knife-throwing act? Remember the time Booth shot the head off an animatronic clown, and Stephen Fry became his therapist? Remember the time they did an alternate-universe episode where Booth and Brennan were married and owned a bar where a murder took place? I do!), and you will just think to yourself, “I did not know how incomplete my life was without that moment.”

How to watch it: Bones is currently in its fifth season; all previous seasons are available on DVD. TNT also runs constant reruns, and rumor has it that FOX will be rerunning it on Fridays this winter, as well. Finally, this isn’t a heavily serialized show—watching it in order is helpful, but not necessary. Cherry-pick at will.

Parks and Recreation

Thursdays, 8:30 p.m., NBC; Hulu

parks and rec

Premise: An ambitious and sometimes oblivious public servant (Leslie Knope, played by Amy Poehler) attempts to do good works (among other things, turn a huge dirt pit into a city park) in Pawnee, Indiana.

This show got off on the wrong foot in so many ways. The first few episodes were a mess—the characters were vague, the dialogue was clearly Office dialogue that didn’t make the cut, and nobody seemed to take Poehler’s comic voice into account. Disaster seemed imminent.

It’s infinitely, unspeakably better now—one of my favorite shows, and WAY funnier than the current season of The Office, if you must know. Summer was obviously kind to Greg Daniels and Friends; they’ve gotten a handle on their characters, Leslie Knope (best government worker name ever, yes?) no longer speaks with Michael Scott’s cast-off dialogue, and they’ve figured out what to do with Rashida Jones as Ann, the “normal” girl in this story. Even better, they made Chris Pratt a regular as Ann’s freeloader ex-boyfriend, who sometimes lives under a tarp in the pit (“Yeah, the hardest part is keeping my suit pressed”)—he’s completely hilarious. It’s light, it’s quick, and it’s really, really funny; if you like awkward humor but find The Office painful, try Parks and Recreation instead.

How to watch it: P&R had one previous season of six episodes; it’s on DVD, but doesn’t seem to exist anywhere (legally) online. In any case, only the last two or three episodes are worth really watching (the one where Leslie takes Ann as her date to an awards ceremony is, however, pretty priceless). The most recent episodes of the current season are on Hulu and NBC.com.